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John Glennville

Is it any wonder. That all wise and influential people have libraries in their houses?. ~ Dad's Little Book of Wisdom

The Park Bench

The play is about an old man who loves the songs of Cole Porter and whose advice on love and marriage, that he dispenses from a park bench, helps a young couple find happiness. A pleasant tale of modern romance.

Act 1 Scene 1
Early spring. Noon. Small stone paths curves to the bench from stage right and stage left. Trees in early blossom behind the bench.
At curtain, Sam is sitting on the stage left side of the bench looking at the clouds. Katherine enters from the path stage right. Katherine sits on stage right side of the bench. She sighs deeply.
SAM: A woman sighs like that and it can only be a problem with a man.
KATHERINE: I don’t want to talk about it.
SAM: She doesn’t want to talk about! Now I know it’s a man. Are you married to this man? (looks closely at her) No, you’re not married. You look too miserable and there is no ring on your finger. If you were married and looked miserable—that’s a different look. (beat) Believe me, I know that look. (pause) You don’t have it. (looks closely) You have the look of a woman who …. I don’t know, but it has something to do with a man.
KATHERINE: I don’t want to talk about it.
SAM: Of course, you don’t want to talk about it. Why would you want to talk about a problem? You talk about a problem, you might solve it…
KATHERINE: I don’t want to talk about it.
SAM: So, we won’t talk about it. Let’s talk about today. Beautiful day, isn’t it. It’s the beginning of spring. Look around you. (Starts singing- lyrics from Let’s Fall in Love) “When the little bluebird (At the words, Katherine looks up quickly) Who has never said a word starts to sing Spring spring spring…”

Suleyman Co-written with Mel Gencer

Classical historical drama blends with Aristotelian tragedy in this retelling the story of the Ottoman’s Empire greatest ruler. A play about power and powerful people written with American sensibilities.

Act I Scene 1 A chamber in the Great House of Prince Suleyman in Manisa circa 16th century. The scene should contain much drapery, jade vases, and a couch. The walls should be painted in bright patterned colors. In the background an entrance to an inner chamber. On the right is an entrance to main hallway. On the left, a doorway that leads to the inner chambers. A map of the Ottoman Empire circa 1515 on the wall with the conquered territories clearly marked.
Lute music from 16th century Ottoman Empire heard off stage.
Suleyman, the prince, dressed in royal splendor sitting on a sedir( a type of pillow throne) in a pensive mood. Hasodabasi, the Executive secretary dressed in the robes of his office enters from the left. Bows as he comes in. Off stage there is noise like a great crowd coming from offstage.
HASODABASI: (bowing) I came as quickly as I could your lordship. The large crowd in the courtyard celebrating the arrival of Mahidevran's newest slave delayed me.
SULEYMAN: I thought our champion Aga Nergis had been challenged to a wrestling match.
HASODABASI: The madness is the same. Mahidevran parades her new slave in the public courtyard for your subjects to admire. (Beat) But I am sure that you did not call me into your presence to discuss the haseki's newest slave.
SULEYMAN: You are correct. You are my Executive Secretary, in change of the wealth of the province, and it is in that capacity that I need you advice. (Pause) My father, Selim, the Emperor, wants to bring the Shiites in Iran into the right path under Allah. To do this magnificent work, he requested from our province 10,000 in gold lira and 600 men. It is with the payment of the gold lira that I need your advice.

The Raven and the Answering Carol

This play tells the story of a meeting between Charles Dickens and Edgar Allan Poe that took place in 1842 at the United States Hotel in Philadelphia, PA. Dickens was on his first tour of the United States. The two men met to discuss an International Copyright Law and the possibility of Dickens arranging for the publication of Poe’s works in England.

Act 1:
TIME: Morning Before Noon
OFF STAGE: Extra… Extra… read all about it. Charles Dickens in Philadelphia. Extra …. Extra… Charles Dickens in Philadelphia.
(Dickens enters with coat hat and scarf, which he removes as he calls to his wife. He keeps looking around at the tables, walks to the anteroom, comes back inside )
CHARLES: Kate… Kate? Kate?
KATE: I will be right there, Charles.
ANNE: (enters stage left) May I take your coat, sir.
DICKENS: Thank you, Anne. Did Kate have breakfast this morning?
ANNE: Dry Toast, bacon and tea, sir. It was very good. Will that be all, sir?
DICKENS: Yes, (Kate enters stage right) Kate, did you see my pipe? I don’t know where I placed it.
KATE: (Entering stage right) Please, Charles, after the train ride yesterday, the very thought of tobacco…
DICKENS: A good pipe is different from a chaw, my dear.
KATE: Charles, promise me that you will never take to chewing tobacco. After that train ride last evening! All that disgusting chewing and expectorating. Did you look at the floor of that train? (sits and begins to knit)

The Insurrectionist

A play within a play about a young man who believes in a modern unifying image for the Moslem world. He finds himself confronted by an old time Moslem radical whose plans for anarchy meet an untimely end in an Upper New York State mosque.

SCENE AT RISE: Tosun enters from center stage. He should be at least sixty--- an older man with a good humor and likeable personality. He will be dressed to match the setting. He could wear something as simple as jeans and a plaid shirt or in a casual pants and shirt as you would seen worn at a theater during a rehearsal. In either case, the clothes must show the man has an element of taste and refinement about him. He walks stage front, pauses, and makes a formal bow swinging his right arm across his body in a huge arc.
TOSUN: Ladies and gentleman, my name is Tosun. I am an American Turk whose parents named me after an old world uncle. The name means strong like bull (flexes his muscles) At least that’s what I was told. I have heard variations of the name, which I will not bother to mention. I will mention that I am your host for this evening. (Holds up his hands as if to stop any would be applause. Looks around at the audience.) Yes. I can see you…. and if I listen closely I can hear you. Sometimes it is a cough… sometimes I hear the unwrapping of a hard candy—you know the type you’re never suppose to unwrap during a dramatic performance. And sometimes… not so often… I hear the dreaded cell phone. (looking around) Yes, I can see you all. But as you are behind the dramatic invisible wall – marked by the invisible line that separate the audience from the actors (motions with a hand to mark the line) – I see you in my imagination. I know you are there….I can see and hear you in my imagination. Imagination--- that is very important to this play.

Mr. Ferguson’s Christmas Eve

An original play about a widowed cemetery caretaker facing retirement who receives some unusual visitors who make his last day on the job a memorable one

BETTY LOU: You think we can do this, Scotty?
SCOTTY: Sure we can. He won’t suspect a thing.
BETTY LOU: Isn’t it wonderful? You know that everyone has decided to make a showing.
SCOTTY: Everyone?
BETTY LOU: Yes, everyone. Nobody wants to be left out. Everyone seems to know this is a special moment.
SCOTTY: I think the little celebration will do him good. He needs something special to happen today, something that will allow him to leave this place with a feeling of closure. But it has to be done so it looks very natural.
BETTY LOU: Scotty, do you really think it’s possible to do this?
SCOTTY: Betty Lou, I thought getting all of us together would be impossible. You’ve done that. Making it look natural will be the easy part. First we’ll need to plan a schedule, something that will not overburden him. We know he’s going to want to put out his wreaths, so we have to plan around that. I don’t think we should send in too many and we’re going to have to limit the time. (Pause) And Betty Lou, one other thing: you have to be one of the representatives.
BETTY LOU: I’ll go if you will go, but Scotty, you have got to go in first. You must.
SCOTTY: I’m not so sure about that. We still have time to plan that.
BETTY LOU: I heard Mr. Dungy say that Horace’s grandson will be stopping by to take some pictures. Could we somehow use that?
SCOTTY: Pictures?
BETTY LOU: His grandson wants to document the whole day, at least that’s what I heard.
SCOTTY: Pictures! What a wonderful idea.

The Last Victim of the Holocaust

Coming Soon

FROM A BULL HORN OFF STAGE: Jerry Kaiser. Jerry Kaiser you have a visitor who wants to see you.
KEISER: You know where you can shove your visitor. Leave me alone.
DODD: Jerry, it’s me, Charlie.
KEISER: Stay out of this, Charlie. This is no concern of yours.
DODD: Screw you. I’m comin’ in.
KEISER: You do and I’ll shoot
DODD: Do what you gotta do. I’m coming in.
KEISER: (lifts his gun and fires a shot out the window) I warned ya! .
DODD: (off stage) You better put the next one between my eyes because I’m still comin’ in.
OFF STAGE BULL HORN: Hold you fire!
Keiser goes to the door with his rifle. Stands behind the wall on the side. Door slowly opens.
DODD: (pokes his head in the doorway) Jerry?
KEISER: Close the door behind you. Nice and slowly. Then lock it.
Dodd locks the door.
KEISER: (puts up his rifle) You are one crazy son of a bitch.
DODD: I’m crazy? Who’s the guy in the house surrounded by a swat team?
KEISER: They showed up

Gaster’s Story

Gaster’s Story—On the tundra of North America live tiny creatures called lemmings who live in colonies called warrens. When the number of lemmings in a warren exceeds the food supply in an area, half the group separates to find a new source of food. Gaster and his friends join together in the pursuit of a dream for a better life only to learn to late that dreams sometimes end in disaster.

Vallahola

Valloholla – A SF novel about a man exiled by aliens 300 years into a future that does not believe in aliens. In his quest to find the creatures who abandoned him, John Forrester uncovers a great secret about the future that allows him to return home.

The Lawgiver

The Reign of the Lawgiver had a beginning and it had an end. Where it began no man has a memory, for it seemed to the citizens of Terrum that the Lawgiver existed from the beginnings of time. The Lawgiver existed and he proclaimed the laws and such was the beginning. For 2,000 years, The Reign of the Lawgiver remained unchallenged. But then, from the bowels of the earth arose a challenge to the Lawgiver. The battle that ensued marked the beginning of the end for the Lawgiver and the end of the beginning for those who called themselves the Followers. The Chronicles refer to this period of time as The Age of Transition, a name that contains the mystery of beginnings and ends.” from: The Book of the Lawgiver.

Blue Mango Moon

Chad and Kayla, two quirky billionaires who made a fortune with their new design colors, want to introduce a new blue mango colored tomato into the marketplace. When the F.D.A. does not approve their application for the genetically altered product, Chad and Kayla decide to buy a controlling interest in the government.

Dad's Little Book of Wisdom

Fatherly advice for tweens and teenagers.

Beyond and Better

A book of philosophy that shows how the physical laws of nature support the spiritual laws


About The Author

Mr John Glennville Novelist / Playwright

John has completed ten novels, two books of philosophy, and five full length plays, three of them written with Co-writer Mel Gencer. John is a member of the Dramatists Guild and selected in 2013 and 2014 for the National Playwright Symposium, Cape May Theater.

At Cape May Stage, Glennville honed his craft by listening and working with skilled playwrights, including John Peilmeier (Agnes of God) and Pulitzer Prize Winner Lee Blessing. Writers featured at the National Symposium have produced hits with titles so familiar that even those who don't follow theater have heard of them. McNally has done the book for the musicals "Kiss of the Spiderwoman" and "Ragtime," Herzog is known for "After the Revolution," while Ludwig's credits include "Lend Me A Tenor" and "Crazy For You." Horovitz has written more than 70 plays, including "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," and "The Indian Wants the Bronx."

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Reviews

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  • ‘The Park Bench’ Offers Gentle View of Evolving Relationships.
    Read the full review

    - LIZ KEILL
  • I cried joyous tears.

    - Dorothy F.
  • Touching and poignant reminder that with age comes wisdom plus humor.

    - Thomas James author 'Of Pagan Gods & other Tales'
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  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
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  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
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  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
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  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
7
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
8
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
9
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque.

    - Jimmy Hugs
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam turpis metus, ultricies quis coaliquet sed neque. Curabitur turpis dolor,rit sed quam.

    - Jimmy Hugs
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